Poroshenko shifts responsibility of anti-corruption court to parliament

2018/2/19 23:01:40

Analyst: “…since Ukraine needs IFI loans this year to keep the economy from destabilizing, we still expect that some sense will prevail among leaders and some compromise will be struck enabling Ukraine to get financing this year from the IMF, the EU and other multilateral partners.

 


KYIV, Feb 19, 2018 - Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko believes that legislation on creating a High Anti-Corruption Court should comply with the recommendations of Ukraine’s Western partners, Concorde Capital informed its clients in an online advisory today. However, he added a condition that this compliance should be effective only to the extent that it does not contradict with Ukrainian legislation, the pravda.com.ua news site reported on Feb. 17, citing comments made to the Munich Security Conference. "It is very important now that we all come together to reach a compromise in parliament," Poroshenko said, as reported by the AFP news agency, which stated that he “would not modify the text despite IMF criticism”.

 

Recall, Ukrainian media published in January a letter from the IMF criticizing a bill to create the anti-corruption court submitted by Poroshenko. The creation of an independent court, in line with recommendations of Western partners, is essential for Ukraine to count on further financial support from the EU and IFIs.

 

Ukraine’s Parliamentary Speaker Andriy Parubiy told IMF representatives on Feb. 15 that the recommendations of the Venice Commission to the bill on the anti-corruption court will likely be included when it will be prepared for the second reading. (The bill has yet to be reviewed for the vote in the first reading). The bill, most likely in the first reading, will be included in the parliamentary agenda in late February, and Parubiy forecasts its final approval by May.

 

Concorde analyst Alexander Paraschiy added: “Poroshenko’s comments are worrisome as they reveal that he is not ready to do all his best to create an independent anti-corruption court. His statement that any changes to the bill depend on parliament doesn't look legitimate as the parliament has only one draft that has already been prepared by president’s team. Instead, it looks like Poroshenko is trying to shift responsibility for the possible failure to adopt an adequate law (and failure to get IFI loans this year) to the parliament. His statement that the law should correspond with Ukrainian legislation is hard to comment on without sarcasm as any new law can amend most of existing laws. For instance, Ukrainian legislation was not an impediment for Poroshenko when he was eager to appoint a close ally as Ukraine’s prosecutor general (the law was amended in one day to allow Yuriy Lutsenko to qualify).

 

Parubiy’s position looks more constructive, but it is hard to believe that most of Ukraine's lawmakers will support creating the anti-corruption court without the president's active prodding. However, since Ukraine needs IFI loans this year to keep the economy from destabilizing, we still expect that some sense will prevail among leaders and some compromise will be struck enabling Ukraine to get financing this year from the IMF, the EU and other multilateral partners.

 

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For more information, link here: www.concorde.ua 

 

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